Recording studio – Sound Riot Records http://soundriotrecords.com/ Tue, 24 May 2022 14:32:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://soundriotrecords.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/ICON-70x70.png Recording studio – Sound Riot Records http://soundriotrecords.com/ 32 32 These Ann Arbor students built a recording studio so they could tell their stories https://soundriotrecords.com/these-ann-arbor-students-built-a-recording-studio-so-they-could-tell-their-stories/ Tue, 24 May 2022 12:08:00 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/these-ann-arbor-students-built-a-recording-studio-so-they-could-tell-their-stories/ ANN ARBOR, MI — It became apparent that students at Pathways to Success High School in Ann Arbor had a desire to have their voices heard that was not being heeded when Quinn Strassel began spending time with them. Teaching these students on Zoom, while also serving as director of Community High School’s drama program, […]]]>

ANN ARBOR, MI — It became apparent that students at Pathways to Success High School in Ann Arbor had a desire to have their voices heard that was not being heeded when Quinn Strassel began spending time with them.

Teaching these students on Zoom, while also serving as director of Community High School’s drama program, Strassel said Pathway students don’t feel they have the same access to opportunities that other high school students have, and they wanted a space to be able to express their creativity.

Strassel left Community High School after leading its theater program for 11 years to start a performing arts program at Pathways to Success, with the goal of helping students who have experienced poverty and trauma find their voice through creative efforts.

“What became clear to me is that so many Pathways kids have extraordinary talent and potential,” Strassel said. “These kids had so much potential that it would take just a little effort for someone to make it happen.”

This year, Strassel launched the Actors Studio at Pathways, where the students spent the school year building a recording studio. ASAP students recently released their first video production, “Voices from the Path”, a 27-minute documentary in five acts depicting the students’ dreams beyond high school, the process of building the recording studio, and an act featuring the school’s “glue”, food service worker “Miss Anita”.

Students raised money to help build the studio before building it this fall, using power tools and installing green screen for the video production used to create ‘Voices from the Path’, which was produced by Strassel .

Featuring student interviews and documentary footage from this school year, “Voices from the Path” gives viewers a glimpse into the joys, dreams, struggles and successes of Pathways students, Strassel said.

Pathways is a secondary school for students who need or prefer a smaller, more intimate school environment that may not be available at larger, comprehensive secondary schools. The school offers online courses, traditional direct instruction models, project-based learning, community internships, and dual enrollment opportunities where students can earn college credit.

“Every day I realize how much these kids have to say and it’s just an honor to help them share their voice with our community,” Strassel said. “Our children have a perspective the world needs to hear and they share it through music, video, poetry and I feel so lucky to even be able to spend my days with these children.”

Each of the five acts of “Voices from the Path” portrays the hopes and dreams of Pathways students in interviews where students talk about their definition of success in act one, including graduation, going in college, set goals and achieve them and just be happy.

Pathways to Success student James Trussel uses a miter saw to cut wood for the recording studio frame. The students helped build a recording studio for Pathways’ Actors Studio at Pathways (ASAP), a brand new performing arts program.Photo provided | Quinn Strassel

Act Two documents the construction of the recording studio, with students using miter saws, installing drywall and insulation, and decorating the studio with spray paint.

Building the studio, creating the documentary, and being able to use it to produce his own rap EP “Blessed Child,” gave 18-year-old Pathways student James Trussell a goal of going to school, a- he declared. In addition to helping him learn to use tools,

“I don’t really like school, but this school made me like school, because it’s doing something that I love,” Trussel said.

The documentary’s third act tells the story of cafeteria worker Anita Hargrove, or simply “Miss Anita,” describing her role as the school’s most valuable employee, according to Passport students. Hargrove’s love for every student is evident, making sure they are all fed, even if they show up late, and handing out bottled water in the cafeteria.

The students described Hargrove’s life at Pathways and elsewhere, a place close to his heart.

“I guess when you really like something or care about something, it all falls into place,” Hargrove said in the documentary. “It ended up being more than just a restaurant service. If you need someone to talk to, someone to cry to, the kids will come to me.

In the fourth act, the students detail their passions and ambitions, which range from producing horror films to singing and recording music.

Pathways student Selena Warren-Riggs documents her interview with Detroit Prod music producer. by Bert, giving insight into the opportunities the students had to interview industry veterans about the music industry.

“Being in the studio kind of gives you a sense of what it’s like to make music and that feeling of really being in the studio and being able to just go in there and express yourself however you want,” said said Warren-Riggs. .

The fifth and final act of the documentary focuses on “love and beauty”, detailing the work of Pathways student Asiya Hurt, who talks about body shaming and self-love while describing her work in the program of cosmetology.

Strassel believes the construction of the studio has given students a sense of pride in where they come to learn, while helping them tell their stories in new and creative ways.

“What I liked about the idea of ​​starting in the studio was that the kids could get hands-on experience and they could take ownership of it immediately,” he said. “I think that’s definitely the case, that the kids felt a sense of belonging to the space.”

READ MORE:

Ann Arbor teen who drowned jumping over bridge remembers being a budding leader

Students walk out of class at Pioneer High to protest the potential overthrow of Roe v. wade

These Washtenaw County Students Received National Merit Scholarships

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Man killed in Hollywood recording studio fire, authorities say https://soundriotrecords.com/man-killed-in-hollywood-recording-studio-fire-authorities-say/ Fri, 20 May 2022 06:19:46 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/man-killed-in-hollywood-recording-studio-fire-authorities-say/ HOLLYWOOD, LOS ANGELES (KABC) — A man was killed after a fire broke out at a Hollywood recording studio on Thursday night. Los Angeles Fire Department firefighters were called just after 5:40 p.m. to the two-story building at 6600 Lexington Ave. The man was found dead after firefighters extinguished the blaze, authorities said. Two people […]]]>
HOLLYWOOD, LOS ANGELES (KABC) — A man was killed after a fire broke out at a Hollywood recording studio on Thursday night.

Los Angeles Fire Department firefighters were called just after 5:40 p.m. to the two-story building at 6600 Lexington Ave.

The man was found dead after firefighters extinguished the blaze, authorities said. Two people were assessed for smoke inhalation but declined to seek medical attention, authorities said.

In a Instagram post shared Thursday night, TV star Sharon Osbourne said his daughter, Aimee Osbourne, was inside the studio at the time with her producer.

“These are the two lucky ones who made it out alive,” she wrote. “It is very heartbreaking that someone lost their life today in this fire and we send our prayers to this person and their family. What happened today was beyond horrific. J I really hope that in the future buildings like this will be better regulated when it comes to fire safety.”

LAFD Captain Erik Scott said studio equipment made the fire difficult to extinguish.

“It was a very difficult fire,” he said. “It was very compartmentalized inside because there were so many different recording studios. You had double drywall, you had insulation, you had soundproofing that really held the heat in. It was a Extremely hot fire. No visibility. So hot, it burned through the first floor floor.”

A hip-hop artist and rapper known as Maxxamillion told ABC7 he lost his entire recording studio and $50,000 worth of equipment.

“I opened the door, saw smoke coming from across the hall, immediately reached out for a jug of water,” he said. “I threw it against the door, the flames erupted. I tried to go back to my room and grab everything I could, but the flames were everywhere and we ran out of the building and it was everything.”

It is not known what started the fire. The cause remains under investigation.

Music producer Justin Barnett said he had lost almost everything in his studio which he had only recently started renting out.

“My girlfriend saw the notifications, said, ‘I think your studio is on fire,'” he told ABC7. “And I was like, ‘Oh, no, this isn’t my studio. I was just there.’ She was like, ‘No, I think your studio is on fire.'”

Barnett said he has been in the music business for about 15 years.

“So I have a few hard drives backed up, I mean, just…equipment,” he said. “And I just moved here – I arrived here on May 1st.”

Copyright © 2022 KABC Television, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Inside Travis Barker’s Calabasas ‘zen’ home, complete with recording studio https://soundriotrecords.com/inside-travis-barkers-calabasas-zen-home-complete-with-recording-studio/ Thu, 19 May 2022 22:11:05 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/inside-travis-barkers-calabasas-zen-home-complete-with-recording-studio/ Travis Barker gave fans a glimpse of his peaceful Calabasas, Calif. home to Architectural Summary. For 16 years, the legendary Blink-182 drummer lived in the minimalist abode with his three children, which he now shares with his new wife Kourtney Kardashian and her family. “The vibe of that room — and my house, really — […]]]>

Travis Barker gave fans a glimpse of his peaceful Calabasas, Calif. home to Architectural Summary.

For 16 years, the legendary Blink-182 drummer lived in the minimalist abode with his three children, which he now shares with his new wife Kourtney Kardashian and her family.

“The vibe of that room — and my house, really — was like Zen,” Barker, 46, said. AD as he showed the living room. “When I come home from long tours or long nights in the studio, just a place to rest my head.”

The nearly 10,000 square foot home was designed by Waldo Fernandez, on the recommendation of none other than Kris Jenner.

“I loved the simplicity and zen quality of his work. We connected immediately,” Barker said of his first encounter with Fernandez.

The one-story abode includes a home recording studio, where Barker recently collaborated with Machine Gun Kelly and Willow Smith. The kitchen matcha station is equipped with cinnamon, nutmeg and cocoa. And Kourtney Kardashian – who sat on the kitchen counter in a button-down lounge shirt – agreed that her husband makes the best matcha in Los Angeles.

The sober, neutral-toned home is a far cry from Barker’s former residences, which he says were full of “flashy cars, murals and bicycles hanging from the ceiling.” Now he prefers a peaceful environment.

“With three kids of mine, plus Kourtney’s kids, this place felt right for this time in my life. I wanted a home where I can rest and enjoy my family, a place where we can make memories,” Barker said.

While Kourtney’s house is only a block away, the drummer plans to convert his home studio into a bedroom with bunk beds to accommodate his three children Mason, Penelope and Reign.

“In the future, I guess we will wait to find something better than what we have. Wherever we end up, we feel incredibly blessed and grateful,” he said.

The couple legally married on May 15 in a courthouse ceremony in Santa Barbara, California. The Poosh founder shared a series of black and white photographs from the occasion on her Instagram account, with the caption: “Till death do us part.” The newlyweds got engaged in October 2021 after less than a year of dating.

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Ozzy Osbourne dons gothic eyeliner as he leaves a California recording studio with his wife Sharon https://soundriotrecords.com/ozzy-osbourne-dons-gothic-eyeliner-as-he-leaves-a-california-recording-studio-with-his-wife-sharon/ Thu, 19 May 2022 21:55:51 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/ozzy-osbourne-dons-gothic-eyeliner-as-he-leaves-a-california-recording-studio-with-his-wife-sharon/ Ozzy Osbourne, 73, dons gothic eyeliner as he is spotted leaving a California recording studio with wife Sharon, 69, just weeks after it was revealed the star of Black Sabbath caught Covid for the first time By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 10:55 p.m. BST, 19 May 2022 | Update: 08:29 BST, 20 May 2022 As […]]]>

Ozzy Osbourne, 73, dons gothic eyeliner as he is spotted leaving a California recording studio with wife Sharon, 69, just weeks after it was revealed the star of Black Sabbath caught Covid for the first time

As he leaves a Los Angeles recording studio, cane in hand, it looks like the days of charging around the stage are far behind Ozzy Osbourne, even if the gothic eyeliner is not .

The Hell of Black Sabbath looked somewhat frail as he was spotted being helped by an assistant into a car outside a recording studio on Tuesday.

But the 73-year-old – who was joined on the rare outing by his wife Sharon – has always dressed up for the role, dressed in all black, with painted fingernails and characteristic long hair.

Black Sabbath hell Ozzy Osbourne looked somewhat frail when he was spotted being helped by an assistant into a car outside a recording studio on Tuesday.

The 73-year-old was joined in the rare outing by his wife Sharon as he still dressed for the role, dressed in all black, with painted fingernails and signature long hair.

The 73-year-old was joined in the rare outing by his wife Sharon as he still dressed for the role, dressed in all black, with painted fingernails and signature long hair.

As he left a Los Angeles recording studio, cane in hand, it seems the days of loading on stage are far behind Ozzy Osbourne, even if the gothic eyeliner is not

As he left a Los Angeles recording studio, cane in hand, it seems the days of loading on stage are far behind Ozzy Osbourne, even if the gothic eyeliner is not

It comes just three weeks after it was revealed that Osbourne, who has a number of health complications including Parkinson’s disease, first caught Covid.

Late last month, Ms Osbourne, 69, stepped down from her new show, The Talk, on TalkTV to return to Los Angeles to care for her husband.

In a tearful interview, she said: “We’ve gone two years without him catching Covid and it’s just Ozzy’s luck that it’s now.”

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How a Recording Studio Pivoted Online During COVID https://soundriotrecords.com/how-a-recording-studio-pivoted-online-during-covid/ Wed, 18 May 2022 16:19:40 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/how-a-recording-studio-pivoted-online-during-covid/ Image source: Getty Images This recording studio entrepreneur is integrating Zoom lessons, mixing services and plenty of PPE to help survive the COVID-19 economic crisis. In 1997, Samori Coles left Omaha on a Greyhound bus bound for Philadelphia after being accepted into the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. While Coles found a home […]]]>

Image source: Getty Images

This recording studio entrepreneur is integrating Zoom lessons, mixing services and plenty of PPE to help survive the COVID-19 economic crisis.

In 1997, Samori Coles left Omaha on a Greyhound bus bound for Philadelphia after being accepted into the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

While Coles found a home in Philadelphia, he never took classes at Wharton. Instead, he saw an opportunity to pursue his passion and start a small business in the process.

“I’ve always loved the arts and music, but I didn’t see a path for that career for me,” says Coles. “I went to work as a financial analyst right out of college and started recording with some of my friends on tape recorders. We ended up getting a few songs on local radio. It transformed me and that I wanted to do in life. I just came here and continued to pursue music.

In the process, Coles found a career in the music industry.

Over the past two decades, Coles has built Lil’ Drummaboy Recordings, a full-service recording studio and audio engineering and music production school located in Philadelphia. The music production business is fiercely competitive in the City of Brotherly Love, but it has thrived. Yet when COVID-19 hit, he encountered challenges he never imagined.

Diversify to survive

To survive in Philadelphia, music studios must diversify. Coles has helped produce audiobooks for Penguin and Random House with authors like Villanova’s two-time national champion basketball coach Jay Wright.

Photo of Samori Coles from Lil' Drummaboy Recordings.

Samori Coles moved from Omaha to Philadelphia in 1997 to pursue graduate school, but soon decided to follow his passion for music. Image source: author

Lil’ Drummaboy specializes in working with independent artists trying to transition from nine-to-five jobs into full-time careers in the industry. “We record bands and artists of all genres, but we also offer a training program where we teach audio engineering and music production to home studios who just want to improve their skills,” says Coles. “This diversity has helped us thrive and grow.”

Coles built Lil’ Drummaboy through his website. Like many small business owners, he relied on search engine optimization (SEO) to build his brand. The SEO helped him get in front of people looking for recording studios or audio schools in the city of brotherly love.

“We get to that first page of Google and often towards the top of that first page,” says Coles. Coles also finds that digital advertising is effective, paying for Google search, YouTube and social media advertising. “We’re very active with advertising,” he says. “We post once or twice a day on Instagram and Twitter. We always try to show what is happening in the studio and who is recording. We always try to create that enthusiasm and curiosity for our brand. »

Adjustment for COVID-19

In mid-March, publicity and branding strategies were replaced with just Lil’ Drummaboy survival, as with many small businesses across the country.

When local shutdown orders were put in place, Coles had to get creative. Lessons in audio production and studio engineering had become a big part of his business. He had considered offering online classes for years. With COVID-19, it has gone from something that might be nice to do one day to a necessity the next.

“After about a week of getting my bearings because this was new to everyone, I had a meeting with my staff, and we decided to use Zoom and continue teaching students who still want to continue to learn,” says Coles. “It was a slow process because not everyone was familiar with using Zoom.”

“So Zoom was the perfect tool to teach our students online.”

About a third of Coles students eventually transitioned to online learning. Since Lil’ Drummaboy provided individual instructions, the prices remained the same.

“The great thing about Zoom is that if we’re teaching a lesson in audio engineering or music production, especially for MacBook users, we can get along,” Coles says. “So I can play something myself and the students can hear it in real time and vice versa. Zoom was therefore the perfect tool to teach our students online.

As people were stuck at home during the pandemic, they started looking for outlets. Budding musicians started recording at home. Coles saw an opportunity there. “We started marketing our mixing and mastering projects service,” says Coles. “If people were recording at home, we told them to send us their files, and we would give them a high-quality mix of the master.”

After experimenting with prices, Lil’ Drummaboy settled on $95 for his mixing services, which is about half the normal price.

“A lot of people started biting on that,” Coles says. “The cool thing is that we have continued these services now that we are back up and running. [at the studio].” Zoom classes and mixing services helped, but Lil’ Drummaboy still lost a big chunk of his spring income. To bridge that gap, Coles tapped into funding from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

“We were lucky because we were able to get a PPP loan so that I could continue to pay my staff,” says Coles. “It really helped us. But it was a difficult time. »

Open Backup

After closing their studio in mid-March, Lil’ Drummaboy finally reopened on June 8. But things look different. When people are in class, they wear masks. If customers enter the check-in booth, they are allowed to remove their mask. Coles staff are also putting on hand sanitizers and sanitizing everything.

“We keep the numbers very small, which is easy to do,” says Coles. “Before, people would come for a recording session, and maybe they wanted to bring a bunch of people with them, but now we’re like, ‘Look, unless you’re essential to this recording, we’ve really need you. yours or just with the people recording.’ »

While Coles is thrilled that customers are once again at Lil’ Drummaboy studios, he now knows the realities of operating during a pandemic. If COVID-19 cases increase, it could be forced to close again. But at least he will be prepared.

“We’ll be ready to move to online classes right away,” Coles says. “Before, we took a week or two to get up to speed. Now, it will be almost like a first switch that we will hit, and we will start marketing, especially mixing and mastering online. We will do live classes much faster.

But at least for now, business has reached pre-pandemic levels. “Over the past month, we’ve grown and we’ve all been surprised by it,” Coles says. “Our books are quite solid and we reserve three or four days. So we’re doing pretty well right now.

3 Ways Lil’ Drummaboy Pivoted Into Crisis

By keeping a cool head, finding a video conferencing platform that suited his needs, and researching services he could offer outside of his studio, Samori Coles kept his business afloat during the pandemic.

Takeaway #1: Adding Zoom Opened Up Opportunities

Samori Coles had long thought of adding virtual audio production and studio engineering through video conferencing. The COVID-19 forcing him to close his studio, he takes the plunge. Luckily, Zoom made it easy for him to transfer his services online.

Takeaway #2: Don’t make rash decisions

When the COVID-19 shutdowns forced Lil’ Drummaboy out of business, Coles didn’t panic. He and his team took a step back for a week and reconsidered their options. After that, they decided to offer virtual lessons and mixing services for home recordings.

Takeaway #3: Consider how you can offer your services outside of your physical location

Even though Lil’ Drummaboy had to close his studios, Coles found a way to produce music. Knowing that people were recording at home, Coles announced that he would be mixing the recordings at home. This opened up a new line of business in a tough market.

When people can’t visit your physical location, find a way to bring your business to them. When COVID-19 shut down Samori Coles’ recording studio, he looked for ways to bring his services to people in their homes. He embraced Zoom, using a tool that allows him and users to get along. With more people recording at home, it also added a service where users could send their recordings home and it would provide mixing services.

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Soundproof Studios announces custom recording studio doors and windows – rAVe [PUBS] https://soundriotrecords.com/soundproof-studios-announces-custom-recording-studio-doors-and-windows-rave-pubs/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:21:35 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/soundproof-studios-announces-custom-recording-studio-doors-and-windows-rave-pubs/ Soundproof Studios provides custom recording studio doors and windows for professional commercial or home studios that require soundproofing. Soundproof sliding glass doors have a Sound Transmission Class (STC) value of up to 65 – the equivalent of absorbing as much sound as the walls of a recording studio – and can significantly block out low […]]]>

Soundproof Studios provides custom recording studio doors and windows for professional commercial or home studios that require soundproofing. Soundproof sliding glass doors have a Sound Transmission Class (STC) value of up to 65 – the equivalent of absorbing as much sound as the walls of a recording studio – and can significantly block out low frequencies (40dB at 80Hz). STC ratings are used for doors, windows, walls and most building materials, with a higher rating indicating a greater ability to stop sound intrusion. The average STC rating in the market today ranges between 33 and 47.

A new door frame design preserves double-wall sound insulation. Indeed, soundproof doors are more efficient and more economical than steel doors.

All recording studio door panels are removable so studio engineers or owners can utilize the full door opening width when needed. Studio glass sliding doors in multi-way telescoping configurations can also optimize the use of space. Wider doors are available for any given rough opening size.

In addition to soundproof doors, the company also customizes soundproof windows for recording studios up to an STC value of 64. These consist of two independent fixed windows on either side of the window opening. Each window can be installed vertically or tilted.

Here are some additional details: www.soundproofstudios.com

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Owner of local recording studio shot, robbed; 2 convicts https://soundriotrecords.com/owner-of-local-recording-studio-shot-robbed-2-convicts/ Sun, 15 May 2022 14:18:12 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/owner-of-local-recording-studio-shot-robbed-2-convicts/ MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Two men were convicted of aggravated robbery after shooting and robbing a recording studio owner in south Memphis, according to the district attorney’s office. The incident happened in July 2018 at IMOB Swag Heavy Studios on South Dudley Street. Investigators said Corey Brown, 31, recorded a song at the studio the day […]]]>

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Two men were convicted of aggravated robbery after shooting and robbing a recording studio owner in south Memphis, according to the district attorney’s office.

The incident happened in July 2018 at IMOB Swag Heavy Studios on South Dudley Street. Investigators said Corey Brown, 31, recorded a song at the studio the day before filming under the name “Goon Corleone”.

Brown arrived at the studio the next day with Christopher Bolden, 31, for another recording session. According to the press release, the owner was hit with a pistol and shot twice in the leg.

Brown and Bolden then stole cash from the owner’s pockets and took a video monitor hooked up to a surveillance system. Investigators said Brown and Bolden did not take the DVR box that showed them leaving the studio with the monitor and an assault rifle wrapped in a shirt.

As they were leaving the studio, one of the men stepped over the owner and shot him again in the shoulder. Investigators said the bullet was still in the owner’s body, lodged near his spine.

Brown and Bolden also have prior convictions and face 15 to 25 years without the possibility of parole.

Both are expected to be sentenced in June 2022.

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Life House needs $10,000 more for a recording studio for homeless and at-risk youth https://soundriotrecords.com/life-house-needs-10000-more-for-a-recording-studio-for-homeless-and-at-risk-youth/ Tue, 10 May 2022 02:53:03 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/life-house-needs-10000-more-for-a-recording-studio-for-homeless-and-at-risk-youth/ Life House Duluth has purchased a building just across 1st Ave which they call “The Imaginarium”. DULUTH, Minn-. A new music recording studio may soon open in Duluth’s Hillside, but it hopes to provide an outlet for homeless and at-risk youth. Life House Duluth has purchased a building just across 1st Ave which they call […]]]>
Life House Duluth has purchased a building just across 1st Ave which they call “The Imaginarium”.

DULUTH, Minn-. A new music recording studio may soon open in Duluth’s Hillside, but it hopes to provide an outlet for homeless and at-risk youth.

Life House Duluth has purchased a building just across 1st Ave which they call “The Imaginarium”.

They raised $20,000 at a mental health action concert last month.

They only need another $10,000 to turn the basement into a studio for the kids in their program to record songs, poetry, or any other recorded art form they want to perform for s ‘to express.

“Being homeless or trafficked creates a tremendous amount of trauma in someone’s life,” said Jordon Johnson, CEO of Life House.

“I think music and the arts are a great way to process some of what’s going on in anyone’s life, but especially our young people like, it’s a fruitful creative outlet,” a- he declared.

According to Johnson, music is already an important way for young people to share stories and experiences at their youth center on First Street.

Their celebration of success event Thursday at the DECC will also serve as a fundraiser for the recording studio.

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Recording studio owner offers gospel artists the chance to record for free https://soundriotrecords.com/recording-studio-owner-offers-gospel-artists-the-chance-to-record-for-free/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:49:00 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/recording-studio-owner-offers-gospel-artists-the-chance-to-record-for-free/ Founder and CEO of Nature Island Foundation for Shiloh Productions, Ken Robinson Founder and CEO of Nature Island Foundation for Shiloh Productions, Ken Robinson, encourages potential gospel artists to register with his recording studio for free for the opportunity to create their own songs. Robinson took the decision to re-open a recording studio stating that […]]]>
Founder and CEO of Nature Island Foundation for Shiloh Productions, Ken Robinson

Founder and CEO of Nature Island Foundation for Shiloh Productions, Ken Robinson, encourages potential gospel artists to register with his recording studio for free for the opportunity to create their own songs.

Robinson took the decision to re-open a recording studio stating that it has been provided with the appropriate assets for the operation, as evidenced by the elegant quality of the studio premises and recording equipment, which have been installed this year.

“The grace of God has prepared me with the knowledge acquired in the studio between 1984 and 2005 and has now placed me in a unique position to carry out this task by giving me access to funding… At this time, we encourage potential recording artists register with the Nature Island Foundation family for Shiloh Productions, to gain access to recording at no cost to them,” he said in a press release.

The CEO said he recognizes the need to transfer the blessing to others who can benefit by recording their music to be played on Dominica and world radio stations so that others can be blessed from the point of view. of singing and hearing the gospel. songs that impact biblical truths and understanding.

Additionally, Robinson said, Dominica needs its citizens to engage in prayer rather than slander and slander, and that getting to know God would be a good thing.

“Gospel music is the most profound in its way of attracting the attention of the capricious to start a new type of life. Some very resourceful people have agreed to give their time to support me in this enormous task which will include competitions of gospel singing and gospel performances,” Robinson remarked.

He said his foundation was started to fulfill the dreams of a multitude of gospel singers and gospel groups in Dominica and that the organization will absorb all the costs of producing and broadcasting the recordings.

Their studio is located at 76. King George the Fifth Street on the Robinson’s Bakery floor.

Those interested can pick up their registration forms at the New Age Photo Studio in the same building.

The foundation can be contacted at 448-6677 or by email at nifsp100@gmail.com.

Mervin Delsol, sound engineer at Nature Island Foundation for Shiloh Productions
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Two dead in Midtown Manhattan ‘recording studio’ shooting as cops hunt 3 suspects who fled scene near Times Square https://soundriotrecords.com/two-dead-in-midtown-manhattan-recording-studio-shooting-as-cops-hunt-3-suspects-who-fled-scene-near-times-square/ Thu, 05 May 2022 10:25:00 +0000 https://soundriotrecords.com/two-dead-in-midtown-manhattan-recording-studio-shooting-as-cops-hunt-3-suspects-who-fled-scene-near-times-square/ TWO people have died after being shot in New York. Cops are searching for three suspects after gunfire reportedly broke out near a recording studio in Manhattan on Thursday. 2 Two people died after being shot in New YorkCredit: ABC7 2 The victims were taken to hospital where they diedCredit: ABC7 One of the victims […]]]>

TWO people have died after being shot in New York.

Cops are searching for three suspects after gunfire reportedly broke out near a recording studio in Manhattan on Thursday.

2

Two people died after being shot in New YorkCredit: ABC7
The victims were taken to hospital where they died

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The victims were taken to hospital where they diedCredit: ABC7

One of the victims was shot in the head, while another was hit in the back, ABC7 reported.

Cops rushed to the scene within seconds as the incident reportedly took place near a New York Police Department station.

They were taken to Bellevue Hospital where they died.

Officers did not identify the victims.

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Cops are looking for three suspects who fled the scene near Times Square.

The motive for the shooting remains unknown.

Investigations into the incident are ongoing.

New York has seen a more than 40% increase in major crimes in the past month, compared to the same period in 2021, according to the NYPD.

In April, dozens of people were injured after a masked gunman opened fire on the city’s subway.

At least 29 people were hospitalized while 10 people were shot when gunfire erupted during the morning rush hour at the 36th Street subway station in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, department officials said New York Fire Department.

A wave of gun violence has rocked parts of the United States in recent weeks.

At least six people were killed last weekend in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Mother-of-one Naya Ruffin, 22, and teenager Jahmal Houston were among the victims.

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Meanwhile, eight people were killed in Chicago last weekend.

And, Milwaukee was rocked by more than a dozen shootings over the April 23 weekend.

More soon…

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